The Political Economy of Scapegoating

 

 

 

ussr-vs-isis1Scapegoating is as old a tactic as political power itself, and a vital tool in the perpetuation of political, economic and social privilege. James Madison, the Father of the US Constitution, expressed a great truism about state power when he described its fundamental role as being to defend ‘the minority of the opulent from the majority.’ What Madison neglected to mention was that the defense of the minority of the opulent against the majority tended to entrench and exacerbate social and economic inequality. This in turn precipitated social chaos as inequality and disorder exacerbated social and class conflict, threatening the stability of the system as a whole.

 

Faced with this situation, the minority of the opulent required some mechanism or other to neutralize social conflict and ensure stability without having to address its root causes in the defense of their economic and social privileges from economic democracy and social justice. They needed to be able to establish and maintain a state of peace without justice, a state long understood to be synonymous with tyranny. Whether the tyranny concerned was that of an individual autocrat, or a class of them, the same problem remained; what the minority of the opulent needed in effect was an ideological safety valve to take the pressure away of actually existing social conflicts and tensions and divert them onto a scapegoat, onto one or another ideological punching bag for the shortcomings of a society devoted to maintaining the minority of the opulent in the lifestyle to which they had become accustomed. Continue reading

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Towards a Social Psychohistory

psychohistoryJan2013

For better or worse this is what I did with the last day of 2012. I guess it must look bizarre as shit but hopefully it will make some kind of sense. I wrote a Masters thesis a few years ago that touched on similar themes and would like to do a PhD on the subject at some stage.

Check this out for a little more explanation if needed: https://historicalunderbelly.wordpress.com/manufacturing-scapegoats-moral-disengagement-in-history/

“Naturally the common people don’t want war; neither in Russia nor in England nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a Parliament or a Communist dictatorship.” – Hermann Goering during the Nuremberg Trials.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_disengagement
• What a terrorist incident in Ancient Rome can teach us: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/30/opinion/30harris.html?pagewanted=all

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9/11
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reichstag_fire
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergey_Kirov#Assassination_and_aftermath
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kronstadt_rebellion
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_scare
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Terror
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_inquisition
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crusades
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witchhunts
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Mediterranean_piracy